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Grant Regen

Solar System imager and Celestron contributing blogger

Grant Regen isn't your typical 14-year-old. Before entering 9th grade this fall, he had already won Astronomy magazine's prestigious Youth Essay Contest, published his own online science magazine, and traveled across the country to attend the largest astronomy expo in the US.

Grant brings a professional approach to his hobby of amateur astronomy and astroimaging. After receiving a Celestron NexStar 8SE and Skyris 618M solar system imager, he quickly taught himself to use this advanced-level equipment and produced images almost immediately. Then, he began sharing his knowledge with others.

His blog series "Learning Skyris," featured here on Celestron.com, explains his process for capturing and processing images. If you've ever wanted to capture the beauty of the Moon, the rings of Saturn, or the Great Red Spot of Jupiter, let Grant be your guide! You'll be imaging in no time.

Blog Articles

Your Chance to Steer Juno

As Juno cycles around the king of planets, amateur astronomers gain a unique chance to personally contribute to the orbiter’s success and even guide its close-up observations. With the addition of a planetary imager and motorized telescope, you can capture valuable Jovian data and send possible targets to JunoCam, a public imager with a relative resolution greater than the Hubble Spac...

Learning Skyris: Painting the Rings

Stealing Jupiter’s reign over the sky, Saturn has awakened from its seasonal slumber and is now the prime target for planetary astrophotographers. While opposition past in May, the following summer months provide pristine views of the planet as it rises in the southern sky. Try to capture Saturn quickly, though, as it steadily dims each passing day. Careful observation and imaging reveal the many delights that set aside the ringed planet as one of astronomy’s universal trademarks.

Learning Skyris: Drawing Color Out of Black and White

During his last flight, Commander William McCool described the view of the Earth below him, “The colors are stunning. In a single view, I see, looking out at the edge of the earth: red at the horizon line, blending to orange and yellow, followed by a thin white line, then light blue, gradually turning to dark blue and various gradually darker shades of gray, then black and a million stars above. It's breathtaking.” Monochrome cameras create stunning views of the universe in black and white, but the addition of three filters can release the hues of nature.

Moon Mosaics

This article comes to us from Grant Regen, a new guest blogger for Celestron. Grant is a teenage amateur astronomer who is just getting started with astroimaging and will explain his process and provide tips for those new to imaging. We look forward to reading more from him!Stepping off the bus, I walked over to my local camera store. On its shelves customers can find every piece of e...

Learning Skyris: Imaging the Moon

This article comes to us from Grant Regen, a new guest blogger for Celestron. Grant is a 14-year-old amateur astronomer who is just getting started with astroimaging. In his series, "Learning Skyris," Grant will explain his process and provide tips and tricks for those new to imaging. We look forward to reading more from him! Just as astronomers recommend the Moon as the first object...

Learning Skyris: Part One

This article comes to us from Grant Regen, a new guest blogger for Celestron. Grant is a 14-year-old amateur astronomer who is just getting started with astroimaging. In his series, "Learning Skyris," Grant will explain his process and provide tips and tricks for those new to imaging. We look forward to reading more from him! Grant recently visited Celestron HQ for a behind-the-scene...