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Astroimaging

Get ready to focus your camera lens on the ever-changing, always-fascinating subjects of space.


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Imaging the Sky Booklet

The astroimaging experts at Celestron have teamed up with our friends at Astronomy magazine for to create this helpful guide to getting started with imaging.

Moon Mosaics

This article comes to us from Grant Regen, a new guest blogger for Celestron. Grant is a teenage amateur astronomer who is just getting started with astroimaging and will explain his process and provide tips for those new to imaging. We look forward to reading more from him!Stepping off the bus, I walked over to my local camera store. On its shelves customers can find every piece of e...

How to Choose a Celestron Solar System Imager

There are more high-quality, affordable, and user-friendly planetary imagers on the market today than ever before, making it easier than ever to get started with astroimaging. But with so many choices, how do you decide? We asked Celestron's imaging expert, Product Manager Bryan Cogdell some frequently asked questions to help you get started in this rewarding hobby.

All-Star Polar Alignment Technology

In order to do long-exposure astroimaging, an equatorially aligned telescope is necessary to allow your telescope to properly track the motion of the sky. Precise tracking still depends on an accurate polar alignment. Even with a visible star very near the North Celestial Pole (NCP), the true celestial pole can be a very elusive place to find without assistance. That’s where All-Star...

Learning Skyris: Imaging the Moon

This article comes to us from Grant Regen, a new guest blogger for Celestron. Grant is a 14-year-old amateur astronomer who is just getting started with astroimaging. In his series, "Learning Skyris," Grant will explain his process and provide tips and tricks for those new to imaging. We look forward to reading more from him! Just as astronomers recommend the Moon as the first obje...

Skyris Image Gallery

Many of the world's top astroimagers beta-tested and use our new line of astronomical CCD camera, Skyris. Here are some of their best shots. Click on each image to enlarge.   Hydrogen Alpha Solar ImageWes HigginsSkyris 274M     Hydrogen Alpha Solar ImageWes HigginsSkyris 274M     Ptolemaeus Alphonsus Hipparchus AlbategniusRobert ReevesSkyris 274M      Orontius Stofler Mauro...

Learning Skyris: Part One

This article comes to us from Grant Regen, a new guest blogger for Celestron. Grant is a 14-year-old amateur astronomer who is just getting started with astroimaging. In his series, "Learning Skyris," Grant will explain his process and provide tips and tricks for those new to imaging. We look forward to reading more from him! Grant recently visited Celestron HQ for a behind-the-sce...

John Davis' Celestron Imaging Setup

Renowned astroimager John Davis first got his start in astroimaging by connecting a Nikon D80 DSLR camera to the prime focus of his Celestron CPC 800 telescope. Since then, he's amassed a collection of advanced Celestron imaging equipment that he uses to create his signature night-sky mosaics. Here's some of John's must-have Celestron gear: EdgeHD 14 Optical Tube Assembly   Since ...

John Davis' Best Shots

Astroimager John Davis of BuckSnort Observatory was kind enough to share some of his favorite shots with us. Make sure to check out BuckSnort Observatory to see even more of John's beautiful astrophotos. Witch Head Nebula   Mosaic: Cocoon and North American   Andromeda Galaxy   M101 - The Pinwheel Galaxy   Pegasus Molecular Cloud   Orion's Belt Mosaic   Cat'...

EdgeHD: Behind the Scenes with Celestron Engineers

Before the DSLR camera, astrophotography was difficult and tedious, often involving manually tracking stars through 30-minute exposures on film. But even back then, amateur astronomers aspired to image the night sky.“20 years ago, when I was selling telescopes, people would always ask me, ‘Can I put a camera on this?’” recalls Eric Kopit, Director of Product Development at Celestron...

How to Choose a Nightscape CCD Camera

For many of us, our first experience with astroimaging comes when we hold up a point-and-shoot camera to the eyepiece of a telescope and take a picture. This simple process, known as digiscoping, opens the door to the world of astroimaging. After digiscoping, imagers commonly progress to a DSLR camera using a T-adapter. With this technique, they can take stunning photos of celestial...